Response To Nus Briefing On International Students


Education, Population, Visas/Work Permits

  • The
    majority of students leave at the end of their studies.

There
is no evidence to support this claim. The IPS still cannot distinguish
departing workers from departing students.  
A recent Home Office study of a sample of cases, ‘The Migrant Journey’,
found that after five years, 20% of students remained in the UK legally. The
other 80% were described as “no longer in the immigration system”.  However, this is not evidence that they had
left the UK.

  • International
    students were worth £8 billion to the UK economy in 2008/09.
    [1]

Migration
Watch UK estimate that non-EU students were in fact worth £4.3 billion, of
which £2.1 billion came from tuition fees.[2]

  • The UK
    is beginning to look less attractive to international
    students.
     

Results
of an NUS survey suggest that 40% of students would not recommend the UK as a
place to study. However, Mr David Willetts, revealed that UCAS applications
from outside the EU were up by 13% on the previous year.[3]
 

  • The UK
    has lost share in the global market for international students.

The NUS
claim that the UK’s share fell from 10.8% in 2000 to 9.9% in 2009. In fact,
student numbers rose from 223,000 to 363,000. A more appropriate measure of the
UK share is that of students who go to MESDCs – Mainly English speaking destination
countries. The UK had 24.6% of this market in 2000, falling slightly to 23.6%
in 2009.

  • The
    timing of the revocation of LMU’s licence is “alarming”

It
would seem however that LMU was given a deadline by the UKBA within which to
address compliance issues found at an earlier inspection. The situation, it is
claimed, had not been addressed satisfactorily so the licence was revoked.

  • Reducing
    student inflows reduces outflows in later years, producing a minimal long term
    impact on net migration.
      

Bogus
students kept out reduce net migration by the same amount as they would not
have left at the end of their courses.  A
reduction in genuine students reduces net migration by about
20% of the fall.                 


[1] BIS Report, Value of UK Education
Exports

[2] Migration Watch UK, Briefing Paper 2.20,
The Economic Value of International Students, URL: http://migrationwatch.co.uk/briefingPaper/document/276


11th September 2012

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